Accepting your burnout, how do you do that?

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Accepting your burnout, how do you do that?

If you’re sitting at home with burnout, that can be difficult to accept. Be thankful for your burnout because it gives you a chance to refocus your life. 

The burnout prompted me to be honest with myself. To no longer hide behind my circumstances but to take the right to a happy existence into my own hands.

The turning point

My therapist’s statement marked the turning point. From then on I let go of my feeling of victimization and started to investigate with genuine interest what the burnout was telling me. Slowly but surely I started to accept my burnout.

I would like to share what helped me with that:

Accepting your burnout, how do you do that?

1. Time for myself

The first thing I was grateful for was the time that was freed up for myself. I used to live on autopilot, racing along in the rat race. Unconscious, conditioned, living my life instead of leading it. The burnout pushed the pause button so that I not only learned to look at these patterns, but I could also actively work with them.

2. Winter phase

By comparing my burnout to a winter phase, I dared to surrender to it in confidence. Winter is a very important stage in nature’s renewal cycle. However, we forget that we are also nature and therefore need this phase just as much. Moreover, it is certain that after the winter comes the spring in which the new emerges. That gave hope.

3. Be honest

The burnout prompted me to be honest with myself. To no longer hide behind my circumstances but to take the right to a happy existence into my own hands. I no longer blamed my boss or my work, but myself. I did that out of leniency, without burdening myself with a feeling of guilt.

4. Focus on the now

Before my burnout, I lived an ‘if…then’ life. If I had saved enough money, I would move abroad. If I had my next diploma, I would start as a self-employed person. The personal crisis made me realize that the only time there is NOW. That I held the key in my own hands to make my dreams come true. Which I did in the meantime.

5. Dare to take steps

Accepting your burnout, how do you do that?

By landing at the bottom of life, my desire to get moving outgrew my fear of the unknown. As the metaphor, I sometimes use during my surfing trips goes: the bottom is to push you off! My burnout meant a catalyst for a new life completely in line with myself!

Worked hard

In our society, people who are sick at home are seen as useless, as a cost or burden to society. However, I dare to say that during the year that I sat at home with my burnout, I worked harder than ever before. The inner work I did during this period was perhaps the most useful work I ever did. Both for myself and for society. After all, I can now give back much more. Working on yourself counts as working! Don’t let anyone tell you otherwise.

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