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Are you a visual thinker?

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The concept was introduced by speech therapist Maria Krabbe in 1951. She worked with children with learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, stuttering and writing problems. According to her, these children appeared to think in images and she called them image thinkers.

Her theory is that reading words with these people will first be converted into images, and also explaining their own ideas in language will often be a concise explanation. Nel Ojemann[1] described image thinking in more detail in 1987 as “a form of thinking that everyone uses as long as one is young”.

According to Ojemann, it is about thinking in images and actions, a flexible handling of reality, which most people give up around their fifth or sixth year in favor of conceptual thinking or word thinking.Visual thinkers, however, do not let go of this, and instead make use of it.

Non-linear thinking

Much more than ‘language thinkers’, visual thinkers can come to a conclusion in an intuitive way. Conclusions or associations arise from the subconscious. Complete situations or overviews (overview) can also be experienced in one image. Image thinkers do not reason by means of language, but by manipulating logical associations in a non-linear way in order to draw conclusions.

Image thinkers see the answer to a problem in front of them (without having consciously thought about it). Visual thinkers are most emphatically present in the modern visual arts and related professional groups where hardly any other medium than the visual is considered. Dyslexia is also relatively common in these directions, but less of a nuisance. Visual thinking develops many spatial insights, which is useful for an architect or carpenter, for example.

These can often think three-dimensionally, going through a house in their minds, envisioning detailed constructions and installations. A map can also be seen when walking through streets. In addition to the fact that image thinking is a way of spatial thinking, it can also be called understanding thinking (see also: Essay on understanding thinking), since everything must first be understood before it can be converted into one’s own ideas and remembered, which by the way is done through the subconscious mind.

go. A map can also be seen when walking through streets.In addition to the fact that image thinking is a way of spatial thinking, it can also be called understanding thinking (see also: Essay on understanding thinking), since everything must first be understood before it can be converted into one’s own ideas and remembered, which by the way is done through the subconscious mind. go.

A map can also be seen when walking through streets. In addition to the fact that image thinking is a way of spatial thinking, it can also be called understanding thinking (see also: Essay on understanding thinking), since everything must first be understood before it can be converted into one’s own ideas and remembered, which by the way is done through the subconscious mind. go.

incapacities

In practice, alleged visual thinkers often struggle with their incapacities. Because they live in a world in which most people are primarily ‘language thinkers’, they are also expected to have some competence in thinking in language. In addition, remembering rare words, such as people’s names, often gives them problems.

Children who are visual thinkers therefore need extra help to learn to read than a language thinker. They also seem to learn more slowly, because internally they learn much more at the same time in their own way. An example is seeing connections that others do not see.

Furthermore, they often need more time than others to ‘sort out’ their ideas, because they see many more aspects of something at the same time and process them in their own ‘multi-dimensional thinking model’. For others it is often not entirely clear what is meant.

So in the area of ​​communication, an extra effort and empathy is required from them. It can come to the point where there is an overload (overload) of input, where there is a desire for a moment of rest. Then all information (in saved images) can still be processed.

Visual Thinking and Synesthesia

A visual thinker also often uses some form of synesthesia. (is a mixture of the senses) For example, a combination of hearing and sight can search for perceptions, to confirm certain ideas. People with this ‘hyper-sensory attitude’ often perceive more than people without this ‘abnormality’.

Often people with autism, Asperger’s syndrome, ADHD and ADD are also visual-thinking. The interaction of clear perception and efficient processing is often the basis for visual thinkers.

Dyslexia

Psychologists often diagnose dyslexia for alleged visual thinkers. Many image thinkers would indeed have difficulty learning to read, but not all so-called image thinkers suffer from the symptoms normally associated with dyslexia.

‘Twenty questions self-image thinking test’

1. Do you mainly think in images instead of words?
2. Do you know things, without being able to explain why?
3. Do you solve problems in unusual ways?
4.Do you have a vivid imagination?
5. Do you remember what you saw and forget what you hear?
6. Are you terribly bad at spelling words?
7. Can you visualize things from different perspectives?
8. Are you organizationally handicapped?
9. Do you often lose consciousness of time?
10. Would you rather read a map than follow verbal directions?
11.Do you remember places you visited only once?
12.Is your handwriting difficult for others to read?
13. Can you sense what others are feeling?
14. Are you musically, artistically or mechanically inclined?
15. Do you know more than others think you know?
16. Do you hate speaking in front of a group of people?
17. Do you feel smarter as you get older?
18. Are you a slave to your (game) computer?

If you answered ‘yes’ to 10 of the above questions, you are most likely a visual-spatial learner.

Source: Silverman, LK (2002). Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual-Spatial Learner (may be copied). Site in English

Characteristics of visual thinkers:

 Visual thinkers have a better spatial insight and feeling. However, the linear expression can sometimes be problematic, given that the more complex images (is a connection of several insights, impressions and experiences) must be limited to linear reasoning.

 Love computers and are often technically, musically, tactically or artistically gifted (see also: multiple intelligence).

 The natural predisposition to ‘absorb read sentences at once’ instead of reading/understanding sentences word for word (speed reading). But when they are asked to read, they often read something other than what is literally written. The images evoked by certain sentences are already present behind certain word combinations.

 The ability to effortlessly remember the locations and relative positions of objects they have placed somewhere. Their ‘photographic short-term memory’ can recall previous situations and moments almost exactly. This is because of not having to think first through the consciousness, but through intuitively inspired images or on the other hand through the subconscious. This reacts, links and associates almost the same as the stimulus (perception, train of thought) it evokes / triggers.

 Often appear younger than they actually are. In particular, some with Asperger’s syndrome have this. These have an unconscious alertness, which automatically notices behavior or facial expressions of others, which appeals or is generally recognized as positive.

 The ability to intuitively draw conclusions that are difficult to reach with linear thinking. The intuition is built up on previous conclusion-oriented train of thought. This should not be confused or considered with/as circular mindsets in non-image thinkers. These are only train of thought which are kept in circulation by one’s own conscious mind. In visual thinking, all kinds of associations from the subconscious are constantly made conscious (even those that have not been thought about before, in other words, new insights.

 A generally oversized creativity that can express itself in all possible areas, not only in the visual arts, but in all activities where some visionary ability can be expressed (contemplative science, technology, business, philosophy, photography,… see also : mi ) .

 They are sociable and empathetic (although that can sometimes come across as ‘different’).That is generally a younger appearance. Like everything that is interesting, this is processed within image thinking. Behavior or movements (that have ever been conscious/done before) are prompted almost as when the circumstances call for it. Because of the unconscious alertness, more unconscious behavior and movements are also noticeable in others, which are then applied unconsciously, but have therefore been conscious (an unconscious expression of consciousness).

 They use a lot of gestures when talking because they see everything clearly and would like to explain it that way.

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