Chinese Medicine: the logic of physical complaints

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Chinese Medicine: the logic of physical complaints
Abdominal pain, snotty, extremely dry skin. Do you now have three completely different complaints or is there actually one problem? What appears to be a coincidence in Western medicine is, according to Eastern medicine, a logical consequence of a weakened element.

What do gallbladder, muscles and eyes have in common? They all fall under the element of wood.

In our opinion, physical complaints are not always logical. Yes, if you bump into something and it hurts, yes. But we cannot always place vaguer complaints such as headache, abdominal pain and joint pain. Especially not when we apparently have very different ailments at the same time. But if you look at them according to Traditional Chinese Medicine, there often appears to be a logical connection. And so there is also a way to treat complaints!

Abdominal pain and cold

Suppose your ten-year-old daughter often has a stomachache, little appetite, always chapped skin with a rash and also has a constant cold. Several doctors examined her. They have prescribed medicines to relieve the complaints and given advice on how to deal with your daughter’s low resistance as well as possible. She seems to have a somewhat ‘weak’ constitution; hopefully she will grow out of it.

If we look at the complaints from Chinese Medicine, there is clearly a weakened metal element here. The large intestine, skin and lungs all fall under this element. Metal ensures that we can absorb input (food, air, information) from the outside world and remove waste products. If metal is too flexible, or too rigid, problems arise in the system of absorption and release. By feeding or discharging the energy of the metal element (just what is needed), the intestines, lungs and skin can function better again.

Chinese Medicine: the logic of physical complaints

Gallbladder, muscles, and eye ailments

Another common example: a person has had their gallbladder removed at a young age. He suffered from gallstones, which made the breakdown of fats increasingly difficult and painful. Since the operation, his digestion is going well. But now he regularly suffers from injuries.

During sports, he quickly sprains his ankles and recently he suddenly started having problems with his left knee. In addition, although he has never worn glasses, his vision seems to be getting worse. He talks about all the complaints. He is not yet thirty and already feels like an old man!

What do gallbladder, muscles, tendons and eyes have in common? They all fall under the element of wood. What appears to be a coincidence in Western medicine is, according to Eastern medicine, a logical consequence of weakened wood. So there is also a treatment method that tackles these physical complaints together.

Psychological complaints

Even the frustration of the young man in the example is an expression of a disturbed wood element. Because in addition to organs, our emotions also belong to the five elements. Anger is underwood, joy under fire, compassion under the earth, sadness under metal, and fear under water. It is therefore no coincidence that this man is particularly disappointed with his complaints and, for example, does not mainly show sadness.

Physical complaints that at first glance have nothing to do with each other, can therefore have logic from the point of view of Chinese Medicine.

 

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