This is what you should do if you have been bitten by a tick! (+ tips on how to prevent it)

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This is what you should do if you have been bitten by a tick! (+ tips on how to prevent it)
‘I was stung by a tick. What now?’ It is a regular question everyone asks. This article shows these and other questions about Lyme disease. And also shares tips on how to prevent infection with Lyme bacteria.

The tick can determine from a distance how your ‘defence’ is doing and naturally prefers a weakened immune system.

When is tick season?

Ticks become extra active at a temperature above 7 degrees Celsius. Most people get a bite from March to October, with a peak in June and July. This can transfer the Lyme bacteria. The ticks live in tall grass and between leaves. You will find them in the forest, but also at playing fields and city parks.

What to do after a bite

Do the following if you have a tick bite. Remove the tick, preferably with a special tick card or tweezers, and make sure that its head is not left behind. Take a picture of the spot and keep an eye out for a red circle or rash. Good to know: this can also affect other skin spots! If a red circle appears and/or you don’t feel well, go to your doctor or a Lyme expert immediately. It is important that you call in the help of an expert within 14 days! A tip: keep the tick to test whether it is infected with pathogens (co-infections). This can be done at a specialized lab.

This is what you should do if you have been bitten by a tick! (+ tips on how to prevent it)

Which test?

You can regularly test whether you have Lyme through your doctor. The ELISA test or the Western Blot test is then used. Both tests check whether antibodies have been produced against the Lyme bacteria. Unfortunately, these tests are not sufficiently reliable. With a direct injection, you usually only develop antibodies after weeks. And in the event of a long-term infection, your body is often no longer even able to produce antibodies, or you do not have/make antibodies because you (have) used antibiotics or immunosuppressants.

I use blood tests that are sent to Germany. In the laboratory, they not only look at antibodies but also at the protein secreted by the Lyme bacteria and its DNA.

How do you recognize an infection?

This is what you should do if you have been bitten by a tick! (+ tips on how to prevent it)

The following symptoms can occur with an infection with the Lyme bacteria.

  • Red circle: you are 100 percent definitely infected > immediate action
  • Skin rash (even in a different place): you are probably infected >  immediate action
  • Flu, not well?: you are probably infected >  immediate action

A tip: fill in the reliable Lyme questionnaire without obligation.

What to do in the event of a (suspected) infection?

I am not a proponent of antibiotics, but when an infection is suspected, I recommend antibiotics right away. The Lyme bacteria needs about 14 days to get the hang of your system. During that period, he can still be traced and killed with antibiotics. It is wise to use good pre-and probiotics afterward.

What is Lyme Symptoms?

  • Pains that jump from place
  • You are very tired and may also suffer from headaches and/or dizziness
  • Ringing in your ears, beeping, or other noise in your ears
  • Tingling, numbness, stinging, and/or itching sensation; like ants walking under your skin
  • Varying emotions such as crying spells, dip, really don’t like it anymore
  • Complaints are changeable; sometimes go crazy with the pain and have little trouble the next dayThis is what you should do if you have been bitten by a tick! (+ tips on how to prevent it)
  • Loss of concentration and poor memory
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • You have been diagnosed with fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, or MS
  • Blood values ​​seem okay; no diseases can be detected

Do you recognize yourself in at least 2 of the above symptoms? Then definitely think of Lyme disease! What was your score on the Lyme questionnaire?

Tips: How can you prevent Lyme?

Of course, prevention is better than cure.

  • Make sure you have a healthy immune system so that the tick does not want to bite you. The tick can determine from a distance how your ‘defense’ is doing and naturally prefers a weakened (acidified) immune system.
  • Keep the grass in your yard short.
  • Drag a white cloth over the ground, so you can see the number of ticks.
  • Remove long branches from the garden.
  • Check your pet for ticks.
  • Wear long sleeves and long pants. Tuck your trouser legs into your socks.
  • Prefers to wear light clothing on which you can quickly spot ticks.

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